Draft Urban Forest Strategy

The City of Canning has developed a Draft Urban Forest Strategy with a vision of creating a resilient urban forest to enhance the liveability and sustainability of the City over the next 20 years and beyond.

The City of Canning currently has an average canopy cover of 7.6%, one of the lowest in the Perth metropolitan region. Increasing canopy cover in these areas will be pivotal for reducing identified urban heat islands, especially in the face of a changing and hotter climate.

The Strategy outlines an action plan with goals for increasing urban canopy throughout Canning by 22% over 20 years, increasing total canopy cover to 9.3% by 2039.

We are seeking your feedback on the Draft Urban Forest Strategy. You can review the summary document and our Action Plan or the full Draft Strategy and provide comments below to have your say on the future of Canning's urban forest.

The public comment period closes 4 October 2019.

The City of Canning has developed a Draft Urban Forest Strategy with a vision of creating a resilient urban forest to enhance the liveability and sustainability of the City over the next 20 years and beyond.

The City of Canning currently has an average canopy cover of 7.6%, one of the lowest in the Perth metropolitan region. Increasing canopy cover in these areas will be pivotal for reducing identified urban heat islands, especially in the face of a changing and hotter climate.

The Strategy outlines an action plan with goals for increasing urban canopy throughout Canning by 22% over 20 years, increasing total canopy cover to 9.3% by 2039.

We are seeking your feedback on the Draft Urban Forest Strategy. You can review the summary document and our Action Plan or the full Draft Strategy and provide comments below to have your say on the future of Canning's urban forest.

The public comment period closes 4 October 2019.

Please provide us with your feedback on the Draft Urban Forestry Strategy here!

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T wish to suggest a few ideas, which may have already been noted:Verge tree, do not ask residents if they want one, just plant them. Include assistance with planting out verges with vegetables etc, check for hazardsNew home/developments - no concrete verges, dust bowls,developers must incorporate green area, in Europe this is the normDoes the City have its own horitcultual department, not just Parks and Gardens. Yake on Horticultual apprecntices, build the standard and become a leader.A number of years ago whilst managing Willetton Library I instigated a 'free seedling'day for Canning residents - when they visited the library, the four libraries participated and it was a great success. Finally I am pleases to live in Ferndale, the river and treees are appreciated every day. No more developments like the old Lynwood Arms Hotel development,everything not to allow. Dr Helen Brown Curtin University April 12 2019 UrbanHeat is killing us. Kinlock School site must be developed with consideration for the mini forest already in place, it could be world class with care and smart thinking.

Colleen Edmeades 1 day ago

It is pleasing to see the City is taking long overdue action to remedy the lack of canopy coverage throughout the Canning. Following Figure 1 - Thermal Imagery - the areas indicating high temperatures are not a surprise. Indeed, if Canning did not have the river, the area of high temperature would be certainly increased. I feel this concern of lack of urdan greenery has been discussed in years previous, with little positive response to show: whenever a building our land is cleared for development - concrete is the only replacement. Prime example of this is the previous Lynwood Arms Hotel site, no trees, high desity , no eaves and so on. An lesson in what should not be allowed, ever.Dr Helen Brown, Curtin University has researched extensively on the adverse effects of urban heat, our health and well being suffer greatly. Refer to Dr Brown's theses April 12, 2019, Urban Heat is a killer.When we moved to Ferndale 43 years ago, many of the original trees were incorporated into the land blocks, our street and home site still retains original treees.Fears are held for the former Kinlock Primary School site on Latham Road Ferndale. The trees are well established, many many years old, providing the buffer against heat and noise, plus habitats for birds and other fauna. Just for once, can thinking and planning incorporate this already thriving green site?I do commend the work undertaken by all involved in this Urban Forest Strategy, may their efforts bring positive change.I wish to take this opportunity to suggest a few ideas [which may have already been noted]:

Colleen Edmeades 1 day ago

A couple of key matters come to mind after reading the draft strategy:Firstly, while we are trying to increase canopy, it is being destroyed at a rapid rate by suburban in-fill. Recently, on the corner of Crawford and Elizabeth, 20 - 30 eucalyptus were destroyed in block clearing to make way for housing. Information needs to be provided to landholders who are subdividing but also there needs to be policy on preventing tree removal through the planning approval stages and penalties for removing significant trees.Secondly, education and encouragement for alternatives where tree planting is not appropriate, such as vertical gardens and better housing design. Roofs are such a waste of space for small units. Better housing design would allow for that space to used for small pot gardens, entertainment etc and this should be actively encouraged by the City.Thirdly, better engagement with the community. Inviting people's plans and ideas for areas. People can submit ideas through the CofC website but it is not easy to upload drawings etc. Members of the community usually have ideas for areas near them and want to be involved. Tree planting or area improvement days run by the City and better engagement with local schools, church groups would be a great idea.Lastly, I love the idea of a tree mascot for Canning - but please don't make it the ubiquitous bottlebrush. We have the beautiful tuart as well as hakea and banksias. Where we have no overhead powerlines, we should be planting large trees that are native to our area.

Carolyn 6 days ago

I have been devastated to see, just this year, several massive, ancient and beautiful gum trees and jacaranda trees in Leslie Street ripped out for multi unit developments. Hoping the urban forest project works to promote urban housing infill which designs around existing mature trees. Canning has many older houses which seem to sell, the bulldozer moves in and nothing is left standing. Decades of tree growth and habitat gone in hours.

863943 7 days ago

I have skimmed and scanned the attached documents and they seem to be well thought out and comprehensive. My main concern is that it will take time to get funding and for planting to start. May I suggest setting up a tree nursery as an initial step which will provide lower cost trees to the scheme and also grow excess trees for sale to the local community providing income. Another income stream could be from the pruning of trees as part of the ongoing management. Larger pieces of wood could be milled for furniture making and hobby work, smaller pieces could be made into mulch and and all of this could be sold to communities as well as leaf mulch.Connecting the patches of green with greenways and beeways would enable wildlife to move around the urban forest.Self guided education packages / walks, for use by children/adults/seniors could document the history of significant trees / document what trees do for us / how to care for your tree / how to identify trees by their leaves, bark, general shape...Trees that shade household properties will reduce heat in summer but should be deciduous so that they allow sunlight to warm the property in winter. Shading may compete with urban food growing (the vegy patch) so this should be a consideration as well. A yard full of food growing plants increases food security in the area and also reduces the heat island effect.Overall comment - go for it and as fast as you can :)

ChrisC 8 days ago

Great idea! Absolutely in support of canopy cover via planting trees on the verges. However, soil and watering is the key to survival of a tree. What are the chances for the residents to keep chickens in the backyard as there are some restrictions for keeping a few chickens. An average household can recycle lots of green waste and also improve the quality of the soil which would naturally aide in growing fruits and vegetables. An overarching theme.If residents are also asked where possible to volunteer with a bit of training to look after those trees until they're well established, it would save a lot of resources. Best wishes and thanks for continuous development in our shire.

sunur 12 days ago

The best way to increase our urban canopy cover is to go back to ensuring that our verges where ever possible has a street tree. In years past the policy was the verges outside each property had a street tree. This was done in years past and it is still visible in some older areas. It would also stop the destruction of our verges due to multiple parking taking place and turning our verges into sandpits and our suburbs into hot dusty places. Once verges are churned up by development and parking, the verges take years to grow back. As council deems in its policy statement that sand as a exceptable verge treatment after building works have taken place.Parking laws should prohibit parking within one meter of a tree as not to damage the root system.An avenue of trees wherever possible is pleasing to the eye and increases the livability of our city in future years this would also aid in the walk ability of our suburbs as they would be cooler.

Collette 14 days ago

The Action Plan provides a logical and positive response to this significant need in Canning. I look forward to seeing more opportunities for school kids and retirees to provide voluntary help in nurseries, at planting sites and through “adopt a tree” initiatives as well as residents rewarded for retaining trees and creating bush corridors on their nature strips.

Catherine Bishop 14 days ago

This strategy sounds well thought out and I look forward to seeing it implemented over the coming years.

PeterBuzzacott 15 days ago